A Traditional Treat

A Traditional Treat

‘Kaffee und Kuchen’ is one of the best traditions in the German-speaking world. To translate it just as ‘coffee and cake’ is about as accurate as describing English ‘afternoon tea’ as a hot drink with a sandwich. Both ceremonies are social rituals. Starting at about 4pm, they involve taking a break from the day and relaxing with friends or colleagues, either at home or in the kind of café where time is not of the essence. Viennese-style coffee houses encapsulate this atmosphere. With their high ceilings and chandeliers, polished wooden tables, newspapers on wooden holders and waiting staff dressed in traditional black and white, they ooze slow living and fin de siècle charm. Ironically, Trotsky is said to have planned the Russian revolution from the Café Central in Vienna, a favourite haunt of bourgeois intellectuals. There’s a Café Central in Innsbruck too, where I captured the Kaffee und Kuchen scene last Sunday afternoon.

Traditional Coffee House scene

So what about Berlin? Probably the least bourgeois of German cities, the German capital is best known for its trendy coffee bars with edgy barristas and shabby-chic cafes with organic teas. But there are plenty of places where it is still possible to indulge in Kaffee und Kuchen in its purest form. Café Einstein Stammhaus in Kurfürstenstrasse is Berlin’s closest offering to a Viennese coffee house. Housed in a beautiful late 19th Century villa, it’s a great place to go for Kaffee und Kuchen. And with its Austrian links, the Apfelstrudel and Sachertorte are top choices for cake lovers.

Inside Café Einstein Stammhaus

It has an interesting history too. In the 1920s, the building was owned by Jewish private banker Georg Blumenfeld and later used as a secret gambling club for the high society of the Weimar Republic. When the National Socialists came to power in 1933, they closed the club. Blumenfeld and his wife were disowned and finally driven to committing suicide. The Nazis took over the villa and Goebbels supposedly gifted it to his secret mistress, Henny Porten, a famous actress at the time. After Henny moved out, it became an illegal SS officers’ casino. The villa miraculously survived the wartime bombing and opened as the original Café Einstein in 1978, at exactly one hundred years old. It proved a great hit with the  West Berlin literati and since then has spawned many other Einstein cafes all over Berlin. The only other Café Einstein with that stylish, historic feel perfect for a Kaffee und Kuchen experience is on Unter den Linden.

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The grand villa building in Kurfürstenstrasse

But the most genuinely historic of all cafés in Berlin is Konditorei Buchwald, a traditional cake shop just by the Moabiter Brücke over the River Spree. The café interior is like a large living room, not as grand as a Viennese coffee house, but there is the same feeling of being in a time-warp. No typing on laptops, mobile phone tunes or background music to disturb the social intercourse here. In summer, the tables set outside in the garden have an equally peaceful setting, with only birdsong to compete with conversation.

Inside Konditorei Buchwald

Gustav Buchwald originally founded the cake company in 1852 in Cottbus, his son moved the business to Berlin at the turn of the century, and it has been run by members of the same family for five generations. The full story is fascinating, and German speakers can follow this link to a Tagesspiegel article which gives all the details. The most recent owner is Andrea Tönges who took over in May 2015. Her grandmother was in charge from 1935 and her mother from 1963. Both Andrea and her mother are ‘Konditormeister’ (master confectioners) and Andrea’s son has chosen the same career path.

Three generations of confectioners – with their famous Baumkuchen

Baumkuchen to take home

Buchwald’s speciality is the ‘Baumkuchen’ which translates literally as ‘tree cake’. The recipe is a secret, but certainly features plenty of sugar, spice and marzipan. The cake mixture is rolled onto a sort of spit (now metal, but originally made of wood) that slowly turns over an open flame, creating fine layers upon layers which look like the growth rings of a tree – hence the name. The cake is then sealed with a glaze or covered in chocolate. The result is so delicious that in 1883 the Buchwald bakery received a warrant of appointment to make Baumkuchen for the royal household. And even now, the Schloss Bellevue, once home to Frederick the Great’s youngest brother, Prince Ferdinand of Prussia, and now the official residence of the German President, is just a walk away in the north end of the Tiergarten.

Queuing outside Buchwald’s

As you enter the shop, the display counter is crammed with cakes (Kuchen) and gateaux (Torten), including several varieties of Baumkuchen. All around the walls and windows, shelves are piled high with more Baumkuchen, beautifully wrapped in all shapes and sizes, which you can buy to take home. When I was last there, a group of tourists came in just to buy the cake as souvenirs and to take photographs. But they missed out on the unique Kaffee und Kuchen ritual: first, the all-important selection of a slice of cake, then the settling into an hour or so of ‘Kaffeeklatsch’ – chatting over coffee.

Selecting a slice of cake

To be sure of a table at Café Einstein or Konditorei Buchwald, especially on a Sunday afternoon, you need to make a reservation. All the details are on their website links below. You can find other café suggestions in a previous Café Society blog, ‘The Great Berlin Cake Off’ (October 2014).

http://www.konditorei-buchwald.de/

http://www.cafeeinstein.com/en/

 

 

Two hidden Italians

Two hidden Italians

I have always thought that Berlin’s free spirit has something Southern European about it. Maybe it’s because of the huge number of immigrants who have come to Berlin from around the Mediterranean and the general feeling of live and let live. Berliners also love to hang out in cafés and there is a long tradition of wonderful Italian restaurants. I have listed quite a number in the ‘Café Society’ chapter of ‘Berlin Unwrapped’, but here are two more discoveries, slightly off the beaten track. They both have that cosy, family-run atmosphere which lifts the soul in the depths of a Berlin winter. Germans call this vibe ‘Gemütlichkeit’ and Berliners can find it in their favourite local Italian restaurant, where they often pop in for an authentic bowl of pasta and sit chatting over a glass or two of Chianti.

Delizie d’Italia is on the eastern edge of the city centre in Kollwitzstrasse, one of those cobbled, tree-lined avenues with unassuming flair in Prenzlauer Berg. As soon as you walk in the door, the ochre-painted walls and red-checked tablecloths transport you to Italy. Originally, Delizie D’Italia was simply a delicatessen. But customers wanted to sample what they intended to buy and by popular demand it evolved into a fully-fledged Italian restaurant.

Preparing for guests at lunchtime

The menu at Delizie d’Italia features fresh pasta, meat and fish creations from the Italian region of Campagna – no pizza here. Locals love this place and in the evenings the candle-lit tables are often fully booked. In summer, the restaurant spills out on to the wide pavement outside, under the spreading maple trees. Service is friendly and efficient, without a trace of attitude found in more hip establishments. Delizie d’Italia offers a catering service as well, where you can order meals to serve at home or in the office. The restaurant is open from noon until midnight, Mondays to Saturdays. It is a15-minute walk from Senefelderplatz U-Bahn station or just three minutes from the M2 tram stop at Prenzlauer Allee/Danziger Str.

The Delizie d’Italia supports Naples

On the western side of the city in Charlottenburg, on the corner of Richard-Wagner-Strasse and Zillestrasse, is another Italian gem, Papageno. Named after the comical bird-catcher in Mozart’s Opera ‘The Magic Flute’, Papageno is only a stone’s throw from the Deutsche Oper. So it’s no surprise to find that opera and ballet goers love to eat here either before or after a performance. The nearest U-Bahn station is either Deutsche Oper or Richard-Wagner-Platz.

Papageno’s ‘Gemütlichkeit’

Papageno’s opening hours are 5pm until midnight, Tuesday to Sunday. The food is divine; cooked by a chef who often appears in the restaurant to flambé one of his creations, or to check that the guests are happy. I recommend trying the Antipasto Papageno, a “surprise appetizer for two people”, followed by the pasta dish of the day, which is always something with seasonal ingredients. You can look at their menu online and will see that the prices are very reasonable. The wine list is good too.

Post-opera conversation

I love the atmosphere at Papageno. It’s definitely ‘gemütlich’ and authentic Italian, with a warm welcome from the staff. Apart from the essential red-checked tablecloths, the walls are covered with beautiful framed photographs, a variety of chandeliers hang from the ceilings and there are some fabulous antique wooden cupboards and mirrors. Best of all, there is a grand piano in the front room of the restaurant with an impressive candelabra bearing witness to magical evenings of musical entertainment. Check out the events on Papageno’s Facebook page.

 

Sicilian fine dining – Berlin style

Sicilian fine dining – Berlin style

For a really special evening meal try Grünfisch at 26, Gräfestrasse, in Kreuzberg. It is one of those wonderful restaurants hidden away in a big city, but so good that everyone would love to find it. Grünfisch has been going for several years and has built up a considerable reputation among Berlin food-lovers. The joint owners, Dang Vu Pham, originally from Vietnam and his partner, Giovanni di Liberto, from Sicily, started with a small 22 seat restaurant. As word spread and they grew bigger, they moved premises several times, eventually arriving in this leafy urban neighbourhood in 2012.

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Grünfisch originally served just fish – hence the name. But why green? Apparently Fengshui says that green creatures with their harmonious colour bring happiness and luck. And that’s the way these two chefs create their dishes – to please both themselves and their guests. The food can be described as modern Italian with an Asian twist and it is both expertly prepared and served, along with a very good selection of wines.

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The interior is tastefully decorated and the pavement terrace is equally inviting. The menu changes daily according to what is available and in season and many ingredients are sourced Sicily. You can always be sure of some fabulous seafood, fish, meat and pasta dishes (average ‘menu’ price for three courses is €27).

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Grünfisch is open from 6pm-12pm daily, except Sundays. It’s best to make a reservation (030 -6162 1252) and the nearest U-Bahn stations are Südstern and Schönleinstraße, each about a 10 minute walk. Or start the evening with a stroll along the Landwehrkanal, admire the sunset from the Admiralbrücke and then make your way through the Gräfekiez (the name of this great local neighbourhood) to the Grünfisch.